Invisible Prison – Track by track

Here’s a run through of the tracks from my new album ‘Invisible Prison’, available from July 13th 2020 through all digital outlets.

Start Over Again
This opening track is a driving rock/blues number. The song starts with the guitar and harmonica playing the same riff. As the rest of this album will hopefully testify, I wanted to use the harmonica as a lead instrument that is on par with any other. This is a theme that reoccurs on this album quite a bit and is my statement about the versatility and stature of the tiny mouth organ. The harmonica can stand up against any other instrument and even lead the way. The lyrics are all about starting your life all over again with someone new; staking a claim and changing lanes.

I Ain’t Never Played An English Song With An English Guy
A classic blues riff has been regurgitated for this song, you’ll know it when you hear it. My Grandmother used to live in Bandera, Texas, USA and I was lucky enough to visit her in 2001. My Grandmother’s friend Tillman wanted to take me to an authentic cowboy bar in the local town. He took me out one night and told me to bring my harmonicas as the locals would love it if I played for them. The first bar we went into had a confederate flag pinned to the ceiling with ‘The South Will Rise Again’ printed across it. Pinned around this flag were signed bras. I was informed that the bras had once belonged to strippers that had performed there. The next bar Tillman took me to had a stage downstairs and a band was playing live. This song is about what happened that night and some of the things the locals said to me. They really did think I was Australian and one of them had a cousin who lived in Oxford and the chap thought I might know his cousin as I lived close(!). The band insisted on playing the Beatles classic ‘Get Back’. The bass player was so pleased at having played an English song with an English guy and turned to the rest of the band and said… you guessed it!

Are You A Have Or Are You A Have Not
This is a ‘bouncing’ blues track, mostly a straight 12 bar blues. I grew up and went to school in one of the most deprived areas of the UK. The lyrics are all about the crappy stuff kids at school used to say to me about my family’s financial situation. We didn’t have much money and in the 1980s it was important to have a well known label on your clothes, a games console and decent mountain bike. Woe betide you if you didn’t have all of those things when you were 12 years old.

KWS
An instrumental rock track inspired by those types of guitarists that have that one track on their album that gives them a chance to show off. (Kenny Wayne Shepherd in this instance). I thought I would do a similar track of my own just using the harmonica to show off instead of a guitar. As the recording of the track went on I felt less and less like showing off and I felt more and more like just letting the instruments breathe. The drums do most of the talking on this one. The impact of the harmonica when it does finally show off has built up to it and therefore has more impact when it kicks in. The layered acoustic and electric guitars compliment each other and create space to enjoy the driving nature of the track.

I Don’t Know When I’m Beaten
A rolling, almost Country style song. The main rhythm backing is done on a low A harmonica that chugs all the way through the song to create a great percussive backdrop. As to the lyrics, I put myself under enormous pressure sometimes when I should actually just admit that I’m not good at something and I should just give up. This song is all about that feeling. The song also features a guest lead guitar solo by Danny R.

It Hurts Like Hell
A riff based rock-blues song about a relationship break up. (Surprise surprise!) Standard 12 bar format with the guitar and harp sharing the main riff. I’m quite proud of the solo on this one, although I do make you wait until nearly the end of the song to hear it! I did all the harmonica parts on this album in one take without cutting in and out, so sometimes if the harp sounded a tiny bit raggedy in places I just left it because I felt that it added to the raw sound and the overall ‘band’ feel. I didn’t want anything too polished. Obviously if I made a complete stuff up of the solo I started the take again. I think it can be too easy with modern recording equipment and DAWs to record something one note or one phrase at a time, quantise it, autotune it etc etc I didn’t want to slowly drain all the feel out of the songs by trying to obtain a twisted version of perfection.

Passed Me By
I’ve gone pure Country on one which is about how in midlife I feel that everyone else is having a wild time and getting up to lots of things and I’m just missing out being busy working in a factory. I found the tone of the low E harmonica lead to the main melody on this track giving it a simple and almost spiritual sound. The low E harp has an earthy and honest sound and I loved it so much that I made art the basis for this song.

Help You
My take on the classic ‘Help Me’ by Sonny Boy Williamson. I just wondered what it would be like from the other side of the original lyrics. What it would be like to be the one that’s being asked for help but isn’t in a position to be able to give it due to their own self preservation or own understandable weaknesses. Although the song is in a minor key, I played it on a major keyed harp to try and get some dissonance in places and to try to play with the tone of the bends and overblows.

3 Heads Are Better Than 1
A 12 bar slow Blues instrumental track. I couldn’t decide which harmonica to use for this improvisation so I used them all one after another. The first solo is in 5th position on a Low F harmonica, second solo is 3rd position on a G harmonica and the last solo is in 2nd position on an Am Natural Harmonica.

I’m Never Gonna Change
A riff based, almost Indie style song about someone that thinks that they are fine how they are and that they do not need to improve or grow at all. I used a natural minor keyed harmonica on this one so that I could get the minor chords, just like a guitar and cut between melody, rhythm and just plain noise and rawk!

It Beats Me Baby
A rockin’ Blues up-beat number about the exasperation of knowing someone that continually falls in s**t but always comes up smelling of roses. A song about someone that lives a charmed life. There may or may not have been a woman in my life at one point that behaved this way, I couldn’t possibly say. I lost the plot a bit on the solo on this one but as I said earlier, one take and unless it sounds truly awful then I leave it!

I Gave Up My Evening For This
Pumping blues track about someone that goes out a lot but gets badgered to stay in by their partner. When they finally do get to spend some time together all they do is argue.

Waiting Blues
A slow blues track about being unable to get on with your life because you feel that you owe it to everyone else to wait for them. A song about feeling held back, a sombre end to an emotional rollercoaster of an album!

Final notes:
Throughout the album I tried to keep to a ‘band’ format: Vocalist, harmonica player, guitarist, bass player and drummer. The aim was to make an album as a band, albeit with only me on the instruments! The harmonica sound was not created using expensive valve amps or crystal element microphones. I recorded the harmonica acoustically and when required I used the distortion and overdrive settings that came with the recording software, a touch of EQ and Fanny’s your maiden aunt! I didn’t have an electric guitar so my mate Paul Harrison lent me his PRS (thanks buddy, it’s a beauty!). I didn’t actually even have a bass guitar either until my wife bought me one for Christmas, so thank you Ali for that. The drums were supplied as loop samples and single hits, all recorded on live drums in a studio by Nathan Luker and cut together by me in the DAW. The guest guitar solo on ‘I Don’t Know When I’m Beaten’ was supplied by my great friend and fellow singer-songwriter Danny R. I recorded the album in my home studio in Lowestoft using the free Garageband software that came with my 2010 iMac and sent the final streams to be mixed and mastered by the amazingly talented Raoul Crane at Blaze Studios.

Although I recorded this album during the spring/summer of 2020 during the pandemic, I was still working full time at my day job in a factory. My job was considered to be ‘essential’ and I was not furloughed. For that reason I don’t really see this as a lockdown album and the album was going to be recorded this year pandemic or not. I did, however, have plenty of free time in the evenings as the pubs were shut so I got to work on finishing this album sooner than I had originally planned.

Invisible Prison – Track by track

2 thoughts on “Invisible Prison – Track by track

  1. WJ Dodd says:

    Hi Paul, will your new album be available on CD at some point in the future?
    I did enjoy your performances with the The Harpoon Blues Band, it was always a treat to have a overnight stay at a nearby B&B in the East Anglia badlands when you gigged.
    All the best, W.J. Dodd, fellow blower with The Society of the Angelic Potheads

    Liked by 1 person

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